Doc Carney

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Archive for the ‘Writing’ Category

How to Find Sources in the Hannon Library (Part 3)

Friday, November 20th, 2009

The series continues . . .

  1. Develop a list of search terms.
  2. Develop a list of search sources.
  3. Create a working bibliography.
  4. Sort your sources.
  5. “Mine” for Citations.
  6. Create Final Bibliography.

3. Create a working bibliography. With your list of search terms and sources to search, begin to collect a bibliography of books, articles, and perhaps primary sources on your topic. It is usually most convenient to use blank or lined index cards to record each citation you wish to pursue. Adopting a standard format for your citation cards will help you later. Each card should include the following information: (more…)

How to Find Sources in the Hannon Library (Part 1)

Sunday, November 15th, 2009

The Len and Dixie Hannon Library at Southern Oregon University is small compared to many academic libraries, but its history collections are well-developed and cover most of world history. Students facing the task of locating useful and important source materials can find themselves confused and lost in a maze of books, journals, and reference materials.

Nevertheless, most student research will require at least some use of off-campus or electronic delivery of books and articles. The Summit Union Catalog Consortium, of which the Hannon Library is a member, can provide most of what you need from off-campus with only a few days wait. Items not held within the Summit system can be requested by ILL with delivery times in most cases of one to two weeks. Given the short academic terms at SOU, early planning and preparation in your research is a must.

Over the next several postings, I will present a number of ideas and suggestions to make your library research task easier and more satisfying.

Here is an outline of the library research process.

  1. Develop a list of search terms.
  2. Develop a list of search sources.
  3. Create a working bibliography.
  4. Sort your sources.
  5. “Mine” for Citations.
  6. Create Final Bibliography.

1. Develop a list of search terms. You will use these to search on-line in the Summit union catalog (which of course includes materials owned by SOU), and to search in printed indexes, bibliographies, and other finding aids. (more…)

Redundancies

Wednesday, October 21st, 2009

In your writing, remove words that repeat the meaning of an associated word. The following are a few examples (highlighted words are unnecessary):

a distance of six miles
advance forward
at the present time
in addition, he also
free gift
false illusion
another one
inside of
future prospects
an actual fact
past history
usual custom
equally as good as
outside of
small in size
retreat back

Why eliminate redundant words?  Because they clutter your writing.  Eliminate as many words as you can from your sentences without changing their meaning.

Stay well, do good work, enjoy yourself.

Doc Carney